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Frequently Asked Questions

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Lockey Mechanical Locks

  1. How do I measure the backset?
  2. How do I know if I have a right or left handed door? 
  3. The instructions call for a 22mm hole, but I can't find a 22mm drill bit!  
  4. Can these deadbolt locks be locked as well as unlocked from the outside? 
  5. How many combinations can your locks use at a time? 
  6. Are any of your locks ADA (American Disability Act) compliant?
  7. What grade are your locks? 
  8. Do all the locks fit 2 1/8” hole? 
  9. Do all the locks fit 1 3/8 – 2” thick? 
  10. Do your packages come with adjustable latches or non-adjustable latches or by our preference? 
  11. Do your locks have key override option? 
  12. Do your locks have oversize knob option? 
  13. Is the 2835 Lever Handle Lock still available?
  14. Does the M210 have a Lifetime warranty? 
  15. What is the difference between L2000 and 2210? 
  16. Are the Locks Changeable in direction?
  17. Is Key-Override Available? 
  18. Easy Grip Over Size Knob Available? 
  19. What is the Warranty on Lockey Locks?
  20. What is the difference between M220 and the 2500? 
  21. Does extension kit apply to every model? 
  22. Key Override:  Is your key compatible with Schlage, Wieser, Baldwin, Quickset or others? 

Carpet & Hard Surface Film & Tapes by KleenKover

  1. What is Carpet Film
  2. What is Hard Surface Film?
  3. What does “reverse wound” mean?
  4. How long can I keep this on the floor?
  5. Will the film leave a residue?
  6. Does humidity affect the film?
  7. Can I use this outdoors?
  8. Why can’t I use Carpet Film on my Wool Carpet? 
  9. How long do I need to wait to put the Carpet Film on a new Carpet?
  10. Can I get more information on Carpet Film?
  11. Can I get more information on Hard Surface Film?

Magnifiers by Bausch & Lomb and Eschenbach

  1. What Is a Magnifier?
  2. What does “Power of Magnification” mean?
  3. What Does “Focal Length” Mean?
  4. What is “Field of View”
  5. What does “Depth of Field” mean?
  6. Why is magnification the most often employed therapy for those with low vision?

Olfa Knife & Blades

  1. Can I use snap-off blades or utility blades with an OLFA rotary mat?
  2. What are the advantages of OLFA ULTRAMAX blades over standard OLFA blades?
  3. What cutter do you recommend for repairing carpet?
  4. Does OLFA manufacture a sharpener for their rotary blades?
  5. What do the numbers around the perimeter of the rotary blades mean?
  6. Does OLFA have a cutter that cuts circles in fabric?
  7. How long should my rotary blade last?
  8. OLFA claims to have "self-healing" mats, what does this mean?
  9. How do I reduce the strong plastic smell from my new rotary mat?
  10. My rotary mat is warped, how do I flatten it?
  11. Does OLFA offer a basic utility knife that uses a dual edge utility blade?
  12. How do I change the blade in my NA-1 cutter?
  13. Do you have any OLFA Knife and Cutter Safety Tips?

Bradley Emergency Eyewash and Showers

OSHA 29CFR 1910.151 & ANSI Z358.1-2004 Regulations

  1. What is OSHA's relationship with ANSI Z358.1?
  2. What is the ANSI Z358.1-2004 Standard?
  3. Where can I purchase my own ANSI Z358.1-2004 Standard?
  4. How many eyewashes or drench showers do I need, and where should they be installed?
  5. Is tepid fluid required by ANSI Z358.1, if so how is it defined?
  6. Does ANSI Z358.1 require the use of a shower curtain (S19-330)?
  7. Does ANSI Z358.1 allow a door between the particulate or hazardous material and where the emergency fixture is located?
  8. How frequently should emergency fixtures be tested, and for what duration of time?
  9. Are annual inspections required?
  10. Does Bradley offer any products to facilitate testing emergency fixtures?
  11. Bradley is known for its BradTect yellow coating, how do coated fixtures differ from uncoated galvanized steel product?
  12. How do I know if I need to install an emergency fixture?
  13. Does ANSI Z358.1 address potable water and its use with emergency fixtures?
  14. Are self-closing ball valves compliant with ANSI Z358.1-2004?
  15. Does ANSI require an alarm system on emergency fixtures?
  16. Does ANSI Z358.1 require that emergency fixtures feature a single-step activation?

    PartSource, Installation and Maintenance

  17. I have a showerhead that I would like to replace with Bradley's SpinTec™ showerhead, what part number should I order?
  18. What incoming water supply size should be used when installing eyewash or drench showers?
  19. Where can I find information about how to maintain my emergency fixture?
  20. I need parts, what is the best way to determine the model number I own and then locate a parts breakdown?
  21. Is there a minimum required distance between an emergency fixture and an obstruction?
  22. What is the counter-top thickness for deck-mounted eyewashes and/or drench hoses?
  23. I tested my eyewash or drench shower and it doesn't have enough pressure, does Bradley have any suggestions?
  24. What is the part number for the yellow plastic handle on my eyewash?
  25. I need to replace the dust covers for the chrome-plated eyewash heads, what part number should I order?
  26. I need to replace the dust covers on my black eye/face wash sprayheads, what part number should I order?
  27. I need to replace the inspection tags on my eyewash, what is the part number?
  28. What is the part number for the 1" and 1/2" chrome-plated ball valve?
  29. Is yellow touch-up paint available? 

    S19-921 On-Site® Portable Gravity-Fed Eyewash

  30. How does the On-Site (S19-921) compare to other gravity-fed portable eyewashes on the market?
  31. Will the On-Site (S19-921) eyewash provide more than a 15 minute flush?
  32. How does the On-Site (S19-921) compare to the single use, preserved and sterile solution used in portable fixtures on the market?
  33. Is sterile solution required?
  34. What is the shelf life of an unopened bottle of Kleersite Ultra Concentrate Eyewash Preservative (S19-865)?
  35. Does Bradley Corp. sell a dust cover for the S19-921 to protect the unit from debris?
  36. How often do the S19-921 Gravity-Fed fixtures need to be tested? 

    Portable Pressurized Eyewash Stations

  37. Why would I need a ASME pressurized eyewash?
  38. Can Portable Pressurized eyewash units be retrofitted with eye/face wash sprayheads?
  39. What happens if I don't change out the water preservative every 120 days?
  40. Can I clean the tanks with bleach?
  41. Could the water freeze in the eyewash yoke if the unit has a Bradley heater jacket?
  42. Should a 5, 10 or 15 gallon tank, be filled with 5, 10 or 15 gallons of water respectively?
  43. If the unit has not been activated, should the eyewash be tested weekly as stated in the ANSI Z358.1-2004 standard? If it has been activated?
  44. What if the water to air ratio is not exact? Ie: Too much water and too little air in the tank.
  45. How should Portable Pressurized Eyewash tanks be pressurized?

    Eyewash and Eye/Face Wash Units

  46. How do I determine if I need to order an adapter with my faucet mounted eyewash (S19-200B)?
  47. Will the faucet mounted eyewash (S19-200B) work with a sensored faucet?
  48. What is the difference between standard eyewash spray heads, dual eye/face wash spray heads and an eyewash with a face spray ring?
  49. Can spray heads be interchanged on Bradley eyewash units? If so, will I need to purchase and/or replace any parts other than the sprayheads?
  50. When I test my eyewash, the water shoots very high, sometimes out of the bowl; what would cause this and how can it be fixed? 

    Drench Showers/Combination Fixtures

  51. Under what circumstances would you recommend the installation of a scald valve on a drench shower or combination fixture?
  52. Why is it important to consider installing drains whenever possible?
  53. How does an Emergency Fixture drench shower differ from a standard household shower?
  54. I would like to test my drench showers, do you have anything to minimize the spray?
  55. I have a drench shower and would like to attach a single head drench hose, can the drench hose also be used as an eye/face wash?
  56. I have a barrier-free fixture, and would like to attach a foot treadle kit, in addition to the paddle activtion handle. Would the fixture still be considered barrier-free with this addition?
  57. I have a barrier-free fixture and wish to purchase the S45-2396, stainless steel retrofit dust cover kit. Will the fixture still be considered barrier-free? 

    Heat Trace Units

  58. What is the difference between a Class I Division I and a Class I Division II fixture?
  59. What do the Explosion Groups B, C, D signify?
  60. I accidentally ordered a top supplied fixture, and need it to be bottom-fed. Can I re-locate the supply myself?
  61. Does the heat trace wire keep the water tepid? 60-100ºF (15-37ºC).
  62. Can I order the fixture with a bowl, stainless steel dust cover or foot treadle kit?
  63. Is the Heat Trace available as a drench shower only?

    Hand-Held Drench Hoses

  64. Does a single head drench hose qualify as an eyewash under ANSI Z358.1-2004?
  65. Can a drench hose be substituted for a drench shower?
  66. How does one choose a back flow preventer for a drench hose?
  67. What is the part number for an under-counter hose guide bracket for hand-held drench hoses?
     
    Flow Switch Alarm Systems

  68. How does a flow switch alarm system work?
  69. Does Bradley sell a flow switch only?
  70. Bradley's alarm systems are double pole, double throw, what does that mean?
  71. Can the eyewash alone trigger an alarm system?
  72. Is it possible to connect the Flow Switch Alarm System to an existing security/safety system?
  73. Does Bradley sell a recessed alarm system?

    Emergency Thermostatic Mixing Valves (TMV's)

  74. Is tepid water required?
  75. What differentiates Bradley's Emergency Valves from the competition?
  76. What are the benefits of purchasing an Emergency Fixture Thermostatic Mixing Valve as opposed to a standard TMV?
  77. How do I properly size Emergency Thermostatic Mixing Valves?
  78. What incoming water supply pipe size should be used when installing eyewash or drench showers?
     
    Bottled Eyewash

  79. If I have several bottles of eyewash near each other, does that satisfy ANSI Z358.1?
  80. How does one interpret the stamped date code on the bottled eyewash?
  81. What is the shelf life of Bradley's bottled eyewash? 

    Frost-Proof/Barrier Free Solutions

  82. Exactly how do freeze and scald protection valves activate?
  83. What type of fixtures does Bradley manufacture that accommodate freezing conditions?
  84. I need an ADA compliant Emergency Fixture, does Bradley offer fixtures that comply?

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Ergodyne Ergonomic and Productivity Products

  1. What makes an effective Ergonomics Program?
  2. Why Back Supports?
  3. What does a Back Support NOT do?
  4. How to Select the Proper Back Support?
  5. Why Wrist Supports?
  6. What Can’t a Wrist Support Do?
  7. How Do I select the Proper Wrist Support?
  8. Why Use a Tool Lanyard? Safety Concerns?
  9. Why Use a Tool Lanyard? Physical Loss and Damage?
Super Lube Lubricants with PTFE 
  1. What is Super Lube?
  2. How does the chemistry of Super Lube differ from conventional petroleum-based greases and mineral oils?
  3. What is special about SYNCOLON® (PTFE)?
  4. What advantages does the Super Lube Lightweight Oil offer compared to lightweight petroleum-based oils?
  5. What are some of the most common uses for Super Lube?

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Lockey Mechanical Locks
  1. How do I measure the backset? The backset is measured from the edge of the door to the center of the hole.  To measure the backset, you only need to make 1 simple measurement. See the diagram below.
    Lockey Backset
  2. How do I know if I have a right or left handed door?  From the outside of the door, whichever side the hinges are on, that is what handed lock you have.  It does not matter whether your door swings in or out, etc. only what side the hinges are on from the outside of the door
  3. The instructions call for a 22mm hole, but I can't find a 22mm drill bit!  The solution is as simple as this: 22mm is equivalent to 1" bore.
  4. Can these deadbolt locks be locked as well as unlocked from the outside? Yes, our keyless combination deadbolts can be locked and unlocked from the inside or the outside. To lock the deadbolt from the outside, simply turn the knob and the door is locked. To unlock from the outside, enter the combination, turn the knob and enter!
  5. How many combinations can your locks use at a time?  Only one combination per lock can be used at a time.
  6. Are any of your locks ADA (American Disability Act) compliant? Yes, the 1150 & 2835  series
  7. What grade are your locks?  Grade 2
  8. Do all the locks fit 2 1/8” hole?  Yes, our locks come with trim plates to cover the standard 2 1/8” hole.
  9. Do all the locks fit 1 3/8 – 2” thick? Yes, and if your application requires a thicker door, we have extension kits that will fit up to 5”.
  10. Do your packages come with adjustable latches or non-adjustable latches or by our preference?  Our deadbolt door locks come with an adjustable deadbolt; however, our latch applications are not adjustable and 2 3/8” or 2 ¾” need to be specified.
  11. Do your locks have key override option?  The 2000 series of the Lockey® Digital Door Locks have a key override option.  These locks include the 2200, 2210, 2230, 2435, 2500, 2210 DC and 2230 DC.  On the double sided locks, the key override option is only available on one side, which is the outside.
  12. Do your locks have oversize knob option?  Yes, again, it is the 2000 series locks.  These locks include the 2200, 2210, 2230, 2435, 2500, 2210 DC and 2230 DC.  For the double sided locks, you will need 2 over sized knobs.
  13. Is the 2835 Lever Handle Lock still available?  Yes it is. 
  14. Does the M210 have a Lifetime warranty?  Yes, on the mechanics of the door lock.  Our warranties do not cover the finishes of the locks.
  15. What is the difference between L2000 and 2210?  Both models of this lock are deadbolts, and the actual deadbolt piece can be interchanged; however, the L2000 is a little smaller in size; has a couple less digits on the combination, and actually has a nicer thumb turn button on the outside for unlocking and locking the door.  The thumb turn throw replaces the round knob which is on the outside of the 2210. 
  16. Are the Locks Changeable in direction?  Yes, all of our locks are field changeable with the exception of the 1150 series.
  17. Is Key-Override Available?  Yes, in the 2200, 2210, 2230, 2435, & 2500.  Current available finishes in the key override option are AB, BB, SC, JB, but check the listing for your lock for details.
  18. Easy Grip Over Size Knob Available?  Yes
  19. What is the Warranty on Lockey Locks? See the listing for the lock you are interested in.
  20. What is the difference between M220 and the 2500?  Both models of this lock are surface mounted locks.  The actual slide bar piece can be interchanged between right and left hand and short and long bar; however, the M220 is a little smaller in size; has a couple less digits on the combination, and actually has a nicer thumb turn button on the outside for unlocking and locking the door.  The thumb turn throw replaces the round knob which is on the outside of the 2200. 
  21. Does extension kit apply to every model? No, check the list of related items on the page your lock is on to see if that lock offers an extension kit.
  22. Key Override:  Is your key compatible with Schlage, Wieser, Baldwin, Quickset or others?  No, our key overrides are unique only to our locks.  They cannot replace any other key and no other key can replace ours.  The cylinders cannot be taken out; therefore cannot be replaced.

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Carpet & Hard Surface Film & Tapes by KleenKover

  1. What is Carpet Film? Carpet Film is a 2 or 3 Mil plastic film that has an adhesive side that sticks to carpet
  2. What is Hard Surface Film? Hard Surface Film is a 3 Mil plastic film that has an adhesive side that sticks to surfaces such as Hard Wood, Tile & Ceramics. Linoleum does not always work with this film.
  3. What does “reverse wound” mean? Reverse wound means the adhesive is on the outside of the roll. This allows for easier application of the film with little or no bending down. Just start unwinding the roll and push it out.
  4. How long can I keep this on the floor? 45 Days
  5. Will the film leave a residue? No, as long as you pick it up within 45 days.
  6. Does humidity affect the film? Yes, try not to store this in a humid area.
  7. Can I use this outdoors? No
  8. Why can’t I use Carpet Film on my Wool Carpet? The adhesive will pull too hard on the wool fibers.
  9. How long do I need to wait to put the Carpet Film on a new Carpet? > 72 Hours
  10. Can I get more information on Carpet Film? Yes, Click Here - Carpet Film http://aaaindustrialsupply.com/.%5Carticles%5Ckleenkover%5CKleenKovercarpet.pdf
  11. Can I get more information on Hard Surface Film? Yes, Click Here – Hard Surface Film http://aaaindustrialsupply.com/.%5Carticles%5Ckleenkover%5CKleenKoverhardsurface.pdf

Magnifiers by Bausch & Lomb and Eschenbach

  1. What Is a Magnifier? A magnifier is a lens that increases the apparent size of objects seen through it. It may be a single lens, thicker at the center than at its edge, or it may be a compound lens made of several lenses mounted or cemented together. By moving closer to an object we are able to see it in more
    detail. But the focusing power of our eyes is limited and we are able to see clearly only down to about 10 inches. A magnifier, in effect, adds focusing power to the eye, enabling us to move closer than 10 inches to the object and to see more detail. We see the effect as an increase in the image size. Depending on its power, a magnifier makes it possible to see an object clearly as close as one-half inch from the eye.
  2. What does “Power of Magnification” mean? The power of magnification refers to the capacity in the lens to increase the image size. X, the symbol used with a number in denoting the power of a magnifier, is quite simply the multiplication sign, “times.” Thus, a 2X magnifier creates an image size twice as large as that which the unaided eye sees at 10 inches. A 3X magnifier triples the image size, and so on.
  3. What Does “Focal Length” Mean? (Working Distance) Focal length is the distance at which a magnifier must be held away from an object to achieve clear focus and maximum magnification. In a 2X magnifier the focal length is approximately 5 inches (the lens thickness is a factor); in a 5X magnifier it is 2 inches; and in a 20X magnifier it is 1/2 inch.
  4. What is “Field of View”? Field of view is the size of the area that can be seen at any one time. In a magnifier, a number of things influence the field of view: the diameter of the lens for instance. However, the power of magnification primarily determines the size of the field of view—the higher the power the smaller the field of view.  See Example http://aaaindustrialsupply.com/.%5Carticles%5Cbausch_lomb%5CBausch_and_Lomb_Magnifiers.pdf
  5. What does “Depth of Field” mean? Depth of field is the distance that you can move a magnifier toward or away from an object and still have the object in focus. It also refers to the depth of the area in front of or behind the viewed object that can be seen clearly. Like the field of view, the depth of field has an inverse relationship with the power of magnification—the higher the power the shorter the depth of field.
  6. Why is magnification the most often employed therapy for those with low vision? It’s actually pretty simple. Diseases such as macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy result in central scotomas, or blind spots, within the field of vision of the sufferer. When viewing an object, these blind spots "e;obstruct"e; the object, partially or completely, making the recognition of the object difficult or impossible. If the object is magnified, however, the blind spots are less of an obstruction, making the object's recognition and identification much easier.

    The photos below help to illustrate this concept.On the left is the simulated view of an excerpt of print through the eyes of someone with macular degeneration. On the right is the simulated view through the eyes of the same sufferer but after employing 4 times magnification.

    Notice how the blind spot on the left obscures many entire letters. On the right, however, only parts of the letters are blocked, making it possible to identify and read the words.

    a box of small text and a box of large text each obscured by a black oval of the same size

    Magnification can be provided in different ways. The object itself can be made larger, such as large-print text in a book or greeting card, the viewer can get closer to the object, or an optical or video system can be used.

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Olfa Knife & Blades
  1. Can I use snap-off blades or utility blades with an OLFA rotary mat? No, OLFA rotary mats are specifically designed for use with OLFA rotary cutters and rotary blades. Snap-off blades or utility blades will damage OLFA rotary mats. OLFA cutting mats are professional quality mats designed specifically for use with OLFA cutters and blades and are twice as thick as OLFA rotary mats.
  2. What are the advantages of OLFA ULTRAMAX blades over standard OLFA blades? OLFA ULTRAMAX blades are exclusively designed for maximum cutting performance. These blades are developed using a special double honing process for superior sharpness, and are 25% sharper than standard OLFA blades. ULTRAMAX blades are perfect for applications requiring specific measurements or finished work.
  3. What cutter do you recommend for repairing carpet? Load OLFA's CMP-2 Heavy Duty Compass Cutter with an LH-20B Heavy Duty
    Snap-Off Hook Blade and cut out the section of burned or stained carpet. The hook blade cuts from the bottom of the carpet, making a clean cut where as a straight blade would put a bevel on the cut.
  4. Does OLFA manufacture a sharpener for their rotary blades? No, OLFA rotary blades are made of tungsten carbide tool steel and are the longest lasting blades in the business. Because OLFA blades are "razor" sharp, it is very difficult to sharpen them without nicking the blade. This could cause the user to damage expensive fabrics.
  5. What do the numbers around the perimeter of the rotary blades mean? The original rotary blade was designed to fit a safety cutter that positioned each section of the rotary blade in a fixed position to be used upon the dulling of the previous section, thus the numbers represented each of those sections. When OLFA introduced the original rotary cutter in 1979, the numbers became irrelevant, but have been maintained as a sort of historical feature representing the original rotary blade.
  6. Does OLFA have a cutter that cuts circles in fabric? Actually - we have two products. For the professional, we have the Rotary Circle Cutter. OLFA’s new premium circle cutter is perfect for cutting circles out in fabric. The unique new ratchet handle is simple and easy to use and greatly reduces wrist fatigue. Designed for both right and left-handed use, the circle cutter can be adjusted to cut circles from 1 7/8” to 8”. Even better, no stabilizer is required for use. Simply determine the size of the circle required, set your cutter accordingly and you’re ready to cut! For occasional use, the CMP-1 will suit your cutting needs. When paper-backed fusible webbing is applied to the fabric, the CMP-1 circle cutter will cut perfect circles up to 6" in diameter.
  7. How long should my rotary blade last?
    OLFA rotary blades are made of tungsten carbide tool steel and are designed to be very durable and long lasting as well as extremely sharp. However, there is no definite answer to how long a blade should last. Blade life depends on many factors including material you are cutting, frequency of cutting, etc. To maximize the life of your rotary blade, OLFA recommends that you always use an OLFA Rotary Mat and apply only enough pressure to cut through your fabric.
  8. OLFA claims to have "self-healing" mats, what does this mean? OLFA rotary and cutting mats have a unique feature that we refer to as the selfhealing process. This means that when used properly with sharp OLFA blades, the cuts tend to form back together on the mat. This is made possible by the components used in production.
  9. How do I reduce the strong plastic smell from my new rotary mat? Due to production and distribution, a new OLFA rotary mat can emit an odorous smell that some people are sensitive too. To overcome this smell, we suggest that the mat be wiped down with a solution of lukewarm water and dishwashing detergent, then let it set for five minutes. Afterwards, rinse off the mat and towel dry. Repeat as needed.
  10. My rotary mat is warped, how do I flatten it? Unfortunately, there is no way to flatten your rotary mat once it has been warped. This is why it is very important to take the time to read the care instructions on your mat. Proper care is the only way to secure the life of your rotary mat. If you have an OLFA rotary mat that is warped, set this aside for use with paper projects.
  11. Does OLFA offer a basic utility knife that uses a dual edge utility blade? Yes, OLFA recently introduced the UTC-1 Auto Lock Retractable Utility Knife. But, with features such as a heavy-gauge stainless steel blade channel, HandSaver cushion grip handle, and a five-position retractable blade, this cutter is anything but basic! For use with OLFA's standard, rounded-tip and hook dual edged blades.
  12. How do I change the blade in my NA-1 cutter? To change the blade in your NA-1 cutter, hold the cutter with the back of the handle pointed away from you. Place your thumb on the blade slide and apply downward pressure with your thumb while pushing the blade slide out the back of the cutter. Now carefully remove the old blade from the peg and place the new blade on the peg, and carefully slide the blade back into the handle.
  13. Do you have any OLFA Knife and Cutter Safety Tips?
    • General Safety Considerations Your Olfa Industrial Cutter is constructed of the highest quality materials possible! It is designed to provide unparalleled cutting performance under even the most demanding industrial applications. As with any tool, safe operation must be the #1 priority. Remember cutters and knives are designed to cut! The following information is provided to help reduce injuries and to ensure satisfactory use of Olfa Products:
    • Maintenance Always visually inspect your cutter before use. Check for damage, excessive wear and ease of operation. Make certain all moving parts are free from debris and that the tool is clean.
    • Check The Blade A dull blade is an unsafe blade. Significantly more force is required to make a cut with a dull or worn blade than with a sharp one. Further, always begin a cutting job with a fresh blade segment.
    • Use The Cutter As A Cutter Many injuries occur when cutter & knives are used for purposes other than those for which the product was designed. Never use a cutter for any purpose other than cutting. Further, never strike the cutter with a hammer or similar device to "force" a cut. This will eventually lead to cutter failure and potential injury.
    • Pay Close Attention to the Blades! Olfa Products feature outstanding blade adjustability. On segmented blades (snap-off cutters), NEVER EXTEND THE BLADE TO A POINT WHERE THE BLADE SEGMENT LINE IS PAST THE END OF THE STAINLESS STEEL CHANNEL. IT IS IMPORTANT TO ONLY USE ONE SEGMENT AT A TIME.
    • Use The Blade Lock A unique feature of many Olfa Products is the positive ratchet wheel blade lock. Always be certain this lock is secure before attempting to make cuts.
      Pay Attention! Always be alert and attentive when using a cutter or knife. Take the time to fully learn the correct use and limitations of any cutter. Never assume that you know how to properly use a knife.

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Bradley Emergency Eyewash and Showers

OSHA 29CFR 1910.151 & ANSI Z358.1-2004 Regulations

  1. What is OSHA's relationship with ANSI Z358.1? When OSHA audits a facility they refer to regulation 1910.151c - Medical services and first aid. The regulation states: "Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use."
    The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z358.1-2004 specifically addresses the details of OSHA regulation 1910.151c - Medical services and first aid. OSHA typically uses the ANSI standard as a guideline when auditing a facility.
  2. What is the ANSI Z358.1-2004 Standard? On January 8, 2004, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) released its 2004 update to the Z358.1-1998 standard. The ANSI Z358.1 standard establishes minimum guidelines for safety equipment used to flush the body of contaminants. It addresses testing procedures, installation instructions, recommended maintenance and training.
  3. Where can I purchase my own ANSI Z358.1-2004 Standard? ANSI Z358.1 is published by ISEA (International Safety Equipment Association), their phone number is 703-525-1695 and web address is www.safetyequipment.org.
  4. How many eyewashes or drench showers do I need, and where should they be installed? Per ANSI Z358.1, emergency eyewashes and drench showers will be no more than 10 seconds or 55 feet to reach and must "be located on the same level as the hazard." The number of eyewashes or showers needed for each hazard is based on the number of workers in that area and the probability that more than one will be exposed at the same time. (4.5.2, 5.4.2, 6.4.2, 7.4.2, Appendix B5)
  5. Is tepid fluid required by ANSI Z358.1, if so how is it defined? Yes, ANSI Z358.1-2004 requires tepid water. Tepid water is defined by ANSI as fluid between 60-100ºF (15.-37.ºC). (4.5.6, 5.4.6, 6.4.7, 7.4.5, Appendix B)
  6. Does ANSI Z358.1 require the use of a shower curtain (S19-330)? During an emergency, that involves hazardous material, the injured is encouraged to disrobe to reduce the possibility of chemical burns, over exposure etc. In such a situation, specifically where both sexes work cooperatively, Bradley Corporation strongly recommends the use of a shower curtain. ANSI does not require it.
  7. Does ANSI Z358.1 allow a door between the particulate or hazardous material and where the emergency fixture is located? Annex B5 of ANSI Z358.1 states "A door is considered to be an obstruction. Where the hazard is not corrosive, one door can be present so long as it opens in the same direction of travel as the person attempting to reach the emergency equipment and the door is equipped with a closing mechanism that cannot be locked to impede access to the equipment."
  8. How frequently should emergency fixtures be tested, and for what duration of time? Plumbed emergency fixtures should be tested on a weekly basis long enough to flush the line of sediment. Self-contained units should be visually inspected weekly. Bradley highly recommends using inspection tags (204-421) to document regular inspections. (4.6.2, 5.5.2, 6.5.2, 7.5.2, 8.2.4.2)
  9. Are annual inspections required? Each year a facility must be inspected to ensure it is still in compliance per the current ANSI Z358.1 standard. Often work stations are relocated and new equipment is purchased, it is important to take the time to re-evaluate where your fixtures are located and be sure they are functional.
  10. Does Bradley offer any products to facilitate testing emergency fixtures? Bradley recommends the use of a shower tester (S19-330ST), which catches the water released from a drench shower and funnels it into a floor drain or bucket. Typically an eyewash tester gauge (269-1444) is placed over the eyewash to be sure it achieves a compliant pattern per ANSI Z358.1-2004. In addition, customers may use a flow meter, to confirm the flow rate.
  11. Bradley is known for its BradTect yellow coating, how do coated fixtures differ from uncoated galvanized steel product? Bradley's standard product features BradTect yellow coating, it provides superior corrosion-resistance in comparison to raw unprotected pipe that is directly exposed to natural elements and chemicals. As an added benefit, the bright yellow coating makes the fixture highly visible in cluttered, dim facilities, and is very easy to identify and locate during an emergency.
  12. How do I know if I need to install an emergency fixture? Consult your organization's Safety Director/personnel for their recommendation. Review chemical MSDS sheets, which indicate the type of treatment recommended for each hazardous material. Other common locations are battery charging or welding stations, anywhere fine particulate or cleaning materials are present and areas where one may be exposed to blood borne pathogens.
  13. Does ANSI Z358.1 address potable water and its use with emergency fixtures? Potable water is required by ANSI Z358.1-2004. It states that the fixtures should "ensure a controlled flow of flushing fluid". Flushing fluid is defined as "Potable water, preserved water, preserved buffered saline solution or other medically acceptable solution manufactured and labeled in accordance with applicable government regulations.
  14. Are self-closing ball valves compliant with ANSI Z358.1-2004? Emergency fixtures must be equipped with stay-open ball valves to be compliant in most installations. ANSI Z358.1 does however make note that "a self-closing valve may be permitted in a school laboratory situation as a limited exception only where the enforcing authority is of the opinion that the hazard posed is not a serious threat." (Appendix B3)
  15. Does ANSI require an alarm system on emergency fixtures? ANSI Z358.1 states that:
    "...users may also want to use audible alarms or a blinking light to indicate that the unit is in operation. These are particularly important in remote areas. Many companies connect valves electrically to warning lights or buzzers in central dispatch areas to alert the appropriate authorities when the unit is in use." (Appendix B4)
    Alarms serve the functions listed below:
    Alert safety personnel that an emergency occurred and medical assistance is necessary
    Serve as a deterrent to vandals
  16. Does ANSI Z358.1 require that emergency fixtures feature a single-step activation? The current 2004 ANSI standard states that the fixture should go from 'off' to 'on' in one second or less. Bradley interprets this statement to mean that a compliant fixture requires only a single-step to activate. (4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2, 8.2.2)

     

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    PartSource, Installation and Maintenance

  17. I have a showerhead that I would like to replace with Bradley's SpinTec™ showerhead, what part number should I order? Several SpinTec retrofit kits as a universal replacement to your broken showerhead.

     

    1. S24-194, Compact yellow SpinTec showerhead and 1", 90º elbow
    2. S24-195, Compact yellow SpinTec showerhead and 1", 90º elbow with 10" plastic shroud
    3. S24-196, Compact yellow SpinTec showerhead and 1", 90º elbow with 10-3/4" stainless shroud
    4. S24-200, High performance stainless steel showerhead and 1" 90º stainless steel elbow
  18. What incoming water supply size should be used when installing eyewash or drench showers? According to the ANSI Z358.1 standard, the minimum flow rate requirements are defined below, the pipe size is based on Bradley fixtures.: Eye/Face Wash (.4gpm/3gpm @ 30 PSI)=1/2" incoming supply pipe
    Drench Shower (20gpm @ 30PSI) = 1" Incoming supply pipe
    Combination Drench Shower w/Eyewash = 1-1/4" incoming supply pipe
    Note: If the pipe size is too small, inadequate flow will be delivered and the unit will not provide enough flushing fluid.
  19. Where can I find information about how to maintain my emergency fixture? The ANSI Z358.1 standard requires that emergency fixtures be tested on a weekly basis to ensure the lines are clear of sediment and debris. ANSI Z358.1 also states that each facility should conduct an annual inspection to be sure they are compliant, as work stations may have changed and new hazards may be present.
  20. I need parts, what is the best way to determine the model number I own and then locate a parts breakdown? If you know the product's model number, you may use Partsource (See button located in the right column of Bradley's webpage under emergency fixtures) or you may enter that model number in the search function to bring up the installation instructions, which feature a complete parts breakdown. If you do not know what model number you have, you may search via image and description under the Emergency Fixture category. Click on the technical data sheet for detailed descriptions of each model.
  21. Is there a minimum required distance between an emergency fixture and an obstruction? Yes, ANSI Z358.1-2004 states there should be a 16" clearance from the center of the spray pattern of a drench shower to the nearest obstruction and 6" from the center of the spray pattern of an eyewash or eye/face wash.
  22. What is the counter-top thickness for deck-mounted eyewashes and/or drench hoses? Bradley Corporation designs its fixtures around the standard one-inch lavatory deck thickness. If you need a fixture to accommodate a lavatory deck that is thinner or thicker than this, please contact Bradley's Customer Service Department for assistance.
  23. I tested my eyewash or drench shower and it doesn't have enough pressure, does Bradley have any suggestions? First identify the source of the low pressure, which may be: incorrect pipe sizing, a system design issue, an improperly sized emergency thermostatic mixing valve, instantaneous water heater or an obstruction in the line, such as pipe dope, which occasionally accumulates at the flow restrictor on eye or eye/face washes. Another possible cause of low flowing pressure is due to inadequate source supply pressure, perhaps requiring an up-sized Water Service or a Domestic water booster system. A flowing pressure of 30 PSI (or 2 BAR) is required at the fixture supply connection. When installing an emergency thermostatic mixing valve, Bradley recommends the 20 GPM flow restrictor (S19-866, S19-866SS) for proper operation. With the restrictor in place, the design flow may be determined as given online by Bradley's Emergency TMV sizing program
    Note: Weekly testing will help alleviate debris accumulation. Testing the drench shower before the eyewash on a combination unit will promote the removal of larger debris through the shower that may otherwise accumulate at the more restrictive eyewash device.
  24. What is the part number for the yellow plastic handle on my eyewash? The part number for the plastic handle only is 128-135.
  25. I need to replace the dust covers for the chrome-plated eyewash heads, what part number should I order? The part number is 107-371, they are sold individually.
  26. I need to replace the dust covers on my black eye/face wash sprayheads, what part number should I order? The eye/face wash dust cover is part number 107-428, they are sold individually.
  27. I need to replace the inspection tags on my eyewash, what is the part number? Inspection tags are sold individually and have enough space to test the eyewash once every week of the year, as required by ANSI Z358.1. The part number is 204-421.
  28. What is the part number for the 1" and 1/2" chrome-plated ball valve? The 1" ball valve, used on drench showers is part number S30-059. The 1/2" ball valve used on eyewash and eye/face washes is part number S27-282.
  29. Is yellow touch-up paint available? Bradley's touch-up paint is sold in a 12oz aerosol can, part number 269-964.

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    S19-921 On-Site® Portable Gravity-Fed Eyewash

  30. How does the On-Site (S19-921) compare to other gravity-fed portable eyewashes on the market? The On-Site or the S19-921 is a unique patented innovation offered exclusively by the Bradley Corporation. It features Bradley's hallmark clear yellow tank, accessible only when the fixture is being maintained, to prevent vandals from tampering with the contents. It provides the ANSI Z358.1 mandated 15 minute flush requiring only 7 gallons of water and an 8oz. bottle of preservative. The fixture ships with a mounting bracket allowing a customer to easily wall-mount the fixture. To facilitate the collection and disposal of the water, a waste cart (S19-399) may be purchased to move the product as working environments are reorganized. A heater jacket may be purchased (S19-921H, S19-921HR) to prevent the water from freezing in frigid conditions.
  31. Will the On-Site (S19-921) eyewash provide more than a 15 minute flush? If the tank is filled completely, yes it will provide minutes of additional flush time. However the unit is designed to provide a single user a 15 minute flush.
  32. How does the On-Site (S19-921) compare to the single use, preserved and sterile solution used in portable fixtures on the market? The On-Site allows people to view the contents inside the tank, activate the fixture, and still have enough fluid to satisfy the 15 minute flush requirement, provided that the water is not below the fill line. Competitive preserved and sterile portable eyewashes do not feature a clear tank, and allow for a single activation only. After that single activation, the unit is no longer compliant, and new pouches must be ordered and installed. This significantly increases the cost to maintain the fixture.
  33. Is sterile solution required? No, The FDA, OSHA and ANSI do not require that an eyewash be sterile. There are many ways to provide employees access to safe, reliable fixtures. Safety personnel may choose from plumbed fixtures, preserved or sterile solutions, or from gravity-fed eyewashes, which use potable water, combined with water preservative.
  34. What is the shelf life of an unopened bottle of Kleersite Ultra Concentrate Eyewash Preservative (S19-865)? Two years from the date of manufacture.
  35. Does Bradley Corp. sell a dust cover for the S19-921 to protect the unit from debris? Please contact Customer Service for assistance and reference part number 269-1627.
  36. How often do the S19-921 Gravity-Fed fixtures need to be tested? After completing installation, test the eyewash briefly for proper operation by pulling down the tray. Visually inspect the eyewash weekly for cleanliness and proper solution level, as indicated on the tank. When the water level drops below the 15-minute fill line, the tank must be emptied and then refilled with potable water and preservative. (S19-865/S19-899) To refill the eyewash tank, follow the procedures outlined in the installation instructions.(Section 5.5.3)

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    Portable Pressurized Eyewash Stations

  37. Why would I need a ASME pressurized eyewash? Usually it is a code requirement. Units with the pressure vessel rating are traceable back to the unit's component part origin. ASME rated units are certified to that performance standard.
  38. Can Portable Pressurized eyewash units be retrofitted with eye/face wash sprayheads? No. By retrofitting the fixture with dual eye/face wash heads, the tank will not provide the same flow rate/duration as indicated on technical data sheets. Many customers request a fixture that will provide a 15 minute flush (S19-690 or S19-788), by changing the flow rate, the fixture will not fulfill the 15 minute requirement.
  39. What happens if I don't change out the water preservative every 120 days? Bacteria and other organisms will begin to grow after 120 days.
  40. Can I clean the tanks with bleach? No, using bleach will corrode the stainless steel tank and is a dangerous liability, should the tank not be rinsed completely. The tank should be cleaned with warm, soapy dishwater and rinsed out before being refilled with potable water and preservative every 4 months.
  41. Could the water freeze in the eyewash yoke if the unit has a Bradley heater jacket? No, the yoke is equipped with a heating element that will prevent the water from freezing.
  42. Should a 5, 10 or 15 gallon tank, be filled with 5, 10 or 15 gallons of water respectively? No, a 5-gallon, 10-gallon, and 15-gallon tank should not be entirely filled with water. Each fixture needs to maintain a specific water to air ratio as called out in the installation instructions. If the tanks are filled with more water than indicated on the installation instructions, Bradley cannot guarantee that the unit will provide the appropriate duration of the flush.
  43. If the unit has not been activated, should the eyewash be tested weekly as stated in the ANSI Z358.1-2004 standard? If it has been activated? The unit does not need to be tested weekly, but it does need to be inspected on a weekly basis, to ensure it is pressurized. If the unit has been activated, then it should be refilled, re-pressurized and tested as soon as possible after activation.(Section 5.53)
  44. What if the water to air ratio is not exact? Ie: Too much water and too little air in the tank. The height of the eyewash arch will remain standard, but the tank will be unable to provide the maximum duration of flow.
  45. How should Portable Pressurized Eyewash tanks be pressurized? Bradley recommends two independent methods:
    A CO2 compressor at a high rating
    A clean diaphragm air compressor with a clean supply
    Note: Piston compressors often are used in conjunction with oil, which would be harmful to the eye. Refrain from using this type of compressor.
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    Eyewash and Eye/Face Wash Units

  47. How do I determine if I need to order an adapter with my faucet mounted eyewash (S19-200B)? The S19-200B, faucet mounted eyewash ships with three standard adapters. Bradley recommends that customers check the thread size and gender of their faucet, in advance and compare that to the details on the S19-200B technical data sheet.
  48. Will the faucet mounted eyewash (S19-200B) work with a sensored faucet? No, this unit cannot be used in conjunction with a sensored faucet; the eyewash needs to have a constant supply of tepid water flowing to it. The valve must remain open once the user activates the fixture. (Section 5.2, 6.2)
  49. What is the difference between standard eyewash spray heads, dual eye/face wash spray heads and an eyewash with a face spray ring? Standard eyewash sprayheads emit a gentle, concentrated flow of water designed to rinse the eyes. Bradley's black, eye/face wash sprayheads emit a soft, wide sprinkler-like flow of water to primarily rinse the eyes and areas around the eyes. Face spray rings are designed to emit a soft sprinkler-like flow of water that encompasses most of the face, and is used in conjunction with standard spray heads focused on the eyes.
  50. Can spray heads be interchanged on Bradley eyewash units? If so, will I need to purchase and/or replace any parts other than the sprayheads? In most cases, sprayheads can be easily switched between standard eyewash and eye/face wash sprayheads. Bradley offers a few options for spray head and spray ring assembly replacement, however we recommend contacting customer service for direction on which parts to order and what components may need to be removed from the existing unit to be completely functional.
  51. When I test my eyewash, the water shoots very high, sometimes out of the bowl; what would cause this and how can it be fixed? Inspect your fixture and be sure that the flow control is still positioned properly. If you own an eyewash or eye/face wash with a spray ring, your flow control will be located in the stem assembly. If you own a dual black head eye/face wash, the flow control is located inside each sprayhead. You may also soak your fixture's yoke in vinegar to remove lime deposits and build-up. Be sure to rinse with vinegar before reinstalling. Build-up causes the water to spray higher, similar to the effect when you place your finger over a garden hose.


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    Drench Showers/Combination Fixtures
  53. Under what circumstances would you recommend the installation of a scald valve on a drench shower or combination fixture? Scald valves are recommended for warm climates where ambient temperature regularly reaches 85°F /30°C and above for any length of time. The scald valve is activated when the water in the pipes reaches temperatures of 85°F /30°C and above. The valve opens and expels the hot water from the unit.
  54. Why is it important to consider installing drains whenever possible? ANSI Z358.1 compliant drench showers feature a stay-open ball valve that allows the shower to flow at a minimum of 20 gallons of water per minute. A person is to remain under the drench shower for 15 minutes, which equates to at least 300 gallons of water that may collect and spread. Drains prevent water damage and minimize slip hazards. Alarm systems may serve as a strong deterrent to vandals, and will minimize the amount of water damage, should there be a false activation.
  55. How does an Emergency Fixture drench shower differ from a standard household shower? A standard household shower releases a maximum of 3gpm. Per ANSI Z358.1, a compliant safety drench shower must release a minimum of 20gpm. The high volume of water is intended to dilute and completely flush the hazardous material off the body. (4.1.4.)
  56. I would like to test my drench showers, do you have anything to minimize the spray? The drench shower tester (S19-330ST) is typically used when activating the drench showers for testing purposes.
  57. I have a drench shower and would like to attach a single head drench hose, can the drench hose also be used as an eye/face wash? No. The single head drench hose is intended as a body wash only.
  58. I have a barrier-free fixture, and would like to attach a foot treadle kit, in addition to the paddle activtion handle. Would the fixture still be considered barrier-free with this addition? No, a foot treadle kit should not be installed on a barrier-free fixture.
  59. I have a barrier-free fixture and wish to purchase the S45-2396, stainless steel retrofit dust cover kit. Will the fixture still be considered barrier-free? Yes. The fixture will still be considered barrier-free. The user merely needs to push against the stainless steel handle, which requires less than 5lbs of force, and the dust cover will pop open, and activate the fixture.
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    Heat Trace Units

  61. What is the difference between a Class I Division I and a Class I Division II fixture? Fixtures that carry a Class I Division I rating are typically selected for environments that have hazardous and explosive material present on a continuous basis. Class I Division II fixtures are normally installed in locations that have explosive materials that frequently enter and leave the vicinity. Consult the local authority having jurisdiction for proper compliance to codes in your area.
  62. What do the Explosion Groups B, C, D signify? The groups signify that the fixture is rated for use when the explosive gases in these groups are present. See NFPA(National Fire Protection Association)/NFC (National Fire Code) for further information. Consult the local authority having jurisdiction for proper compliance to codes in your area.
  63. I accidentally ordered a top supplied fixture, and need it to be bottom-fed. Can I re-locate the supply myself? No. Relocating the supply voids the manufacturer's warranty. The supply should not be relocated in the field; it presents a risk of freezing due to the configuration of the pipes and the location of the freeze valve.
  64. Does the heat trace wire keep the water tepid? 60-100ºF (15-37ºC). No the heat trace wire, insulation and freeze protection valve prevent the water from freezing and bursting the pipes.
  65. Can I order the fixture with a bowl, stainless steel dust cover or foot treadle kit? The heat trace (S19-300), cannot be ordered with a bowl, foot treadle kit or a stainless steel dust cover. The foot treadle kit and the stainless steel dust cover may freeze in place.
  66. Is the Heat Trace available as a drench shower only? Please contact Customer Service for more information.
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    Hand-Held Drench Hoses

  68. Does a single head drench hose qualify as an eyewash under ANSI Z358.1-2004? Drench hoses are available with a single sprayhead or dual sprayheads. Per ANSI Z358.1, drench hoses with a single sprayhead do not meet all the criteria of an eyewash because they do not have dual spray heads for flushing both eyes simultaneously. Compliant drench hoses with dual spray heads feature a stay-open ball valve and allow the hands to remain free to help open the eye lids. (8.2.1)
  69. Can a drench hose be substituted for a drench shower? A drench hose is a supplemental device only. It will not satisfy OSHA or ANSI's requirement of a 20gpm and a 15 minute full body drench.
  70. How does one choose a back flow preventer for a drench hose? Local codes and ordinances govern what type of backflow preventer is required. Bradley offers three models. See their technical data sheets for more information. Consult the local authority having jurisdiction for proper compliance to codes in your area. (S27-303, S45-2309, S45-2310)
  71. What is the part number for an under-counter hose guide bracket for hand-held drench hoses? The hose guide bracket is part number 140-226.

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    Flow Switch Alarm Systems

  72. How does a flow switch alarm system work? The flow switch fitting is installed horizontally into the line with a vertical T. When the drench shower or eyewash has been activated, a paddle inside the alarm system toggles and activates the alarm system, sounding an audible and visual alarm. In cases where a separate electrical cable has been wired into the main control room, an electrical signal will be sent indicating an emergency has occurred and emergency personnel should be notified.
  73. Does Bradley sell a flow switch only? Yes, please contact customer service.
  74. Bradley's alarm systems are double pole, double throw, what does that mean? The number of poles refers to the total number of contact sets included with the alarm system. Meanwhile, the term throw refers to the positions with contact that are electrically isolated and available for connection. Each of Bradley's alarm systems is double pole, double throw, meaning they include an extra set of electrical contacts, that allow hard wiring into a central computer system.
  75. Can the eyewash alone trigger an alarm system? Yes. The flow switch activates at 2.4gpm, and all of our eyewash units have a flow great enough to activate the alarm.
  76. Is it possible to connect the Flow Switch Alarm System to an existing security/safety system? Yes, Bradley Alarm Systems are DPDT, or Double Pole Double Throw, so there is an extra set of contacts in the flow switch junction box, which work mechanically in parallel with the contact set used by the local alarm. The contacts are electrically isolated from the set being used, so there is no interference. For more details visit www.bradleycorp.com, type S19-320 in the search function, and see page 8 of the installation instructions under "REMOTE SENSING OPTION".
  77. Does Bradley sell a recessed alarm system? Yes, please contact Customer Service.  

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    Emergency Thermostatic Mixing Valves (TMV's)

  78. Is tepid water required? Yes. The 2004 ANSI Z358.1 standard is the first to require tepid water. Tepid water is defined as 60-100ºF (15-37ºC). (4.5.6, 5.4.6, 6.4.6, 7.4.5, 8.2.3.4)
  79. What differentiates Bradley's Emergency Valves from the competition? Bradley is the only manufacturer that makes its own emergency fixtures and emergency thermostatic mixing valves. Bradley employs a unique fixed cold-water bypass design to ensure that scalding does not occur.
  80. What are the benefits of purchasing an Emergency Fixture Thermostatic Mixing Valve as opposed to a standard TMV? An emergency thermostatic mixing valve features an integral fixed cold-water bypass that provides cold water even if the hot water supply is lost. Bradley's valves maintain a full volume of water even if the hot water runs out before the ANSI Z358.1 mandated 15 minute flush is complete.
  81. How do I properly size Emergency Thermostatic Mixing Valves? There are several factors to consider before getting started. First, you must determine the manufacturer's flow rate for each type of fixture. (The ANSI Z358.1 minimums are .4 GPM @30 PSI for eyewashes, 3 GPM @ 30 PSI for eye/face washes and 20 GPM @ 30 PSI for drench showers. However, manufacturers' flow rates may vary.) Second, figure out the pressure available in your building, taking into consideration that long runs of pipes add to pressure drop. Contact the valve manufacturer for specific pressure drop information. Now, total up your fixtures and multiply them by their actual flow rates. For example: 3 eye wash stations 3.0 GPM @ 30 PSI (actual flow) 9 GPM 4 eye/face washes 3.5 GPM @ 30 PSI (actual flow) 14 GPM 23 GPM Total Output @ 30 PSI You would need a valve that would provide a minimum of 23 GPM total output to accurately supply tepid water to all fixtures if they were used simultaneously.
  82. What incoming water supply pipe size should be used when installing eyewash or drench showers?
    According to the ANSI standard, the minimum flow rate requirements are:

     

    • Eye and facewash (.4 gpm/3 gpm @ 30 PSI) = 1/2" incoming supply pipe
    • Drench Shower (20 gpm @ 30 PSI) = 1" incoming supply pipe
    • Combination Drench Shower w/Eyewash = 1 1/4" incoming supply pipe

    If pipe size is too small, inadequate flow will be released and the unit will not provide enough flushing fluid. It is important to reference the installation instruction manuals for the equipment you are installing to ensure proper pipe size is being used based on the design of the equipment.

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    Bottled Eyewash

  83. If I have several bottles of eyewash near each other, does that satisfy ANSI Z358.1? No. Bottled eyewash is a supplemental resource only. A compliant station provides 15 minutes of uninterrupted flow that follows an ANSI Z358.1 mandated pattern. Bottled eyewash is meant to be used for immediate first aid, and used to flush the eye before the 15 minute flush. (5.1.6, 5.1.8, 6.1.6, 6.1.7, 8)
  84. How does one interpret the stamped date code on the bottled eyewash? Prior to January of 2007. The Date code was stamped as you see it below.
    Example: B40520A Alphanumeric code indicating lot # for tracing batches of eyewash solution. EXP 04/06 Expiration date deciphered as 04 = April, 06 = 2006
  85. What is the shelf life of Bradley's bottled eyewash? The Opti-Aid, Opti-Aid Plus and the OneStep have an expiration date of 3 years from the date of manufacture. Please note, when the seal has broken, the solution is no longer sterile and the bottle should be disposed.

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    Frost-Proof/Barrier Free Solutions

  86. Exactly how do freeze and scald protection valves activate? Protection valves have a thermostatic plunger valve assembly. This thermostatic valve open and closes relative to the water temperature. This exchange of fresh water either warms of cools the water in the fixture and the fixture based on the type of valve used and the temperature of the water being supplied.
  87. What type of fixtures does Bradley manufacture that accommodate freezing conditions? The Bradley Corporation offers three different types of products that accommodate freezing conditions.
    One of the most popular solutions is the Heat Trace (S19-300), this product is built to order, and features a thermostat and electrical cable that wraps around the pipes, which are then covered with insulation. It also features a freeze protection valve that bleeds off the cold water prevents freezing if power is lost.The Heat Trace is often installed in locations that may reach -50ºF or those that require a Class I Division I or Class I Division II rating. Another alternative would be a frost-proof fixture, which features a buried ball valve, or a valve that is located inside the building, sheltered from freezing conditions. Other versions of these fixtures feature a supply connection pipe that extends into the ground below the frost line. Excess water is drained off this pipe and is expelled to prevent pipes on the surface from freezing and/or bursting when ambient temperature is below freezing. To order this fixture, a customer should know the freeze depth in their region. (S19-120HFP, S19-210HFP, S19-220HFP, S19-310HFP, S19-310TW, S19-310NN) Frost-proof valves are a third solution that are recommended for locations that may on occasion have temperatures below freezing, but primarily remain above 32° F/ 0°C. Freeze valves are activated at 45°F / 7°C and function by opening to expel water in the pipes onto the ground, or through a hose or diversion instrument attached to remove water from the pipes so it doesn't have a chance to freeze. This method is not recommended in areas where freezing temperatures are frequent and last for any extended period of time.(S45-1986, S45-1987)
  88. I need an ADA compliant Emergency Fixture, does Bradley offer fixtures that comply? ADA does not directly address Emergency Fixtures in its text. Bradley does however have many fixtures that have been designed with handicapped accessibility in mind. These fixtures are referred to as Barrier-free. Bradley dedicates a specific Barrier-free section of emergency fixtures, to these handicapped accessible units.

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Ergodyne Ergonomic and Productivity Products

  1. What makes an effective Ergonomics Program? Worksite analysis to determine ergonomic hazards and job functions that are high risk.
      1. Engineering controls, such as the design or redesign of the job environment and procedures.
      2. Administrative controls, including job rotation, rest periods, decreasing the number of repetitions per worker.
      3. Medical management, including past work illness and injury histories, monitoring work situations,
      4. providing educational materials and seminars on leading a healthy lifestyle.
      5. Training and education on job procedures; causes, risk factors and symptoms of cumulative trauma
      6. disorders, and the health effect of exposure; and reporting procedures at all levels.
      7. Personal protective equipment, such as back and wrist supports, used as a supplement to engineering
        and administrative controls.
  2. Why Back Supports? Supplementing an ergonomics program with back supports can be an important step toward controlling the risk of back injury. Selecting the proper back support is even more significant in achieving effective results. Most back injuries are caused from repetitive lifting, bending, twisting and turning activities instead of from a single episode. Overtime, these activities strain the supportive structures in the lower back. It’s estimated nearly 85 percent of all reported back injuries occur in the lumbo-sacral joint, or the L4 and L5 area of the lower back. A well-designed flexible back support will cover and support this region of the back.
  3. What does a Back Support NOT do?
      1. Back supports will not allow a worker to lift more weight.
      2. Back supports will not prevent back injuries. They are a control measure to help reduce the risk of injury. Reducing the risk factors help reduce the incidence rate. Back supports should be used with other control measures.
      3. Back supports are not a substitute for an effective ergonomics program. They are a supplemental partof a comprehensive ergonomics program, which includes job task analysis, ergonomic redesign, medical surveillance, training and education, and the use of personal protective equipment.
      4. Back supports also have a positive role to play in those situations where the risk of injury cannot be readily engineered out of a job, such as in patient care, hospitality, construction, or delivery service settings.
  4. How to Select the Proper Back Support
      1. Check for a design that conforms to the body ensuring a comfortable, secure fit. Back supports should sit below the navel and fit snugly on the hips, covering the vulnerable L5 and S1 area.
      2. Check for an adjustable two-stage closure that allows the user to tighten the support during lifting activities and loosen when in a nonlifting position.
      3. Check for an internal gripping mechanism. These devices reduce ride up and help keep the back support in place. It’s best if these materials are non-conductive so the support can be used in a variety of applications and worksettings.
      4. Check to make sure the materials are breathable and machine washable. Inferior materials can be hot and uncomfortable to wear and may need to be hand washed.
      5. Check the material specifications for overall durability. Inferior hook-and-loop closures, elastic band and other critical components will breakdown, reducing function, and increasing long-term cost.
      6. Check out a back support company’s credibility, resources and product line. Make sure they are providing the proper training and support with your ergonomics programs.
  5. Why Wrist Supports? Supplementing an ergonomics program with wrist supports can be an important step toward helping reduce the stress and pain associated with repetitive motions of the wrists. Selecting the proper wrist support is even more important to obtain essential support and comfort without compromising dexterity, flexibility or productivity. It’s estimated people may flex their wrists as much as 5,000 times in the course of a normal workday. The repetitive downward and upward, and side to side motions, the wrists endure can result in sprains and strains. Over time this may result in more serious injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome and tendinitis. A well-designed flexible wrist support should add comfort and support without restricting normal range of motion, finger dexterity or productivity.
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  6. What Can’t a Wrist Support Do?
      1. Wrist supports will not compensate for poor workstation design and proper rest breaks.
      2. Wrist supports will not prevent wrist injury. They are supplemental control measure to help maintain neutral wrist posture. Controlling risk factors helps reduce the incidence rate. Wrist supports should be used with other control measures.
      3. Wrist supports will not substitute an effective ergonomics program. They are a supplemental part of a comprehensive ergonomics program, which includes job task analysis, ergonomic design, medical surveillance, training and education and the use of personal protective equipment.
  7. How Do I select the Proper Wrist Support?
      1. Check for flexible support that limits flexion and/or extension. Some models feature flexible spiral stays providing firm support. Others may have an open-center stay that is designed to provide support and reduce pressure on the median nerve for added comfort.
      2. Check for a design with an adjustable closure so the support can be tightened or loosened to ensure a snug but comfortable fit. Avoid excessive bulk that may restict movement.
      3. Check for a design that provides needed support and materials suited to the job task. Some models feature durable materials to withstand daily use in tougher jobs. Workers at risk to strain and injury due to lighter duty repetitive activities and static positions may benefit from supports made with lightweight materials and have a more compact design.
      4. Check for a flexible support product versus rigid support. Flexible supports allow some range of motion to complete tasks comfortably and efficiently. Rigid splints, commonly prescribed by medical doctors, are designed to completely restrict any movement to encourage healing.
      5. Check to make sure the materials are breathable and machine washable. Some models even may have interior ventilation holes to promote air flow to help keep the hands dry. Inferior materials can be too hot and uncomfortable to wear.
      6. Check the material specifications for overall durability. Inferior hook-and-loop closures, elastic bands and other critical components will breakdown, reducing function, and increase long-term costs.
      7. Check the manufacturers experience, reputation, resources and product line. Make sure they can provide proper training and support with your ergonomics programs.
  8. Why Use a Tool Lanyard? Safety Concerns?Anyone working from heights- people like roofers, utility workers, arborists, antenna and windmill installers; and others- has a responsibility to prevent their tools from from becoming falling objects which could strike a co-worker or pedestrian below. Falling from ladders, scaffolds, or bucket trucks, these objects could result in fatal injuries, even if the victim is wearing a hard hat.
    OSHA regulations are specific regarding falling objects from elevated work surfaces and floor openings. Whereas the guardrails on scaffolds and platforms are designed to protect elevated workers from falling, the 4 inch high toe boards are required to protect the workers below from falling tools and objects.
    Loose tools are also potentially a hazard when accessing elevated work surfaces, or when descending into recessed ones, such as utility vaults. Safe work practices require 3 points of contact at all times when climbing a ladder. This is impossible to do when one hand is hanging onto a hammer or drill. Even loose tools in a tool belt or an unsealed bucket are subject to falling.
  9. Why Use a Tool Lanyard? Physical Loss and Damage? Tethering Tools not only prevents injuries, but also reduces the risk of damage to property or process equipment as well. The most obvious loss is to the tools themselves. Dropping from elevation is likely to cause damage or destruction of the tool, depending upon the surface below. Even simple hand tools can be significantly damaged when hitting concrete from elevation.
    If tools are dropped into mud, snow, or heavy brush, tool loss is likely. Tool loss can also be expected when working over water, as on bridges, docks or boats. This type of loss also applies to other common but important workplace items suck as flashlights, cell phones, radios, test equipment, and cameras.
    Property damage on a rough construction site might be limited to windows or vehicles parked below, but in certain assembly or maintenance situations damage to process equipment below can be extensive. In many aerospace, nuclear, and process industries workers are not allowed to carry anything in open pockets. In these situations, items as simple as a ball point pen falling into equipment can require expensive shutdowns and repair work. Larger tools or items can result in even more severe “foreign object damage”

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Super Lube Lubricants with PTFE 

  1. What is Super Lube? Super Lube is a patented, multi-purpose synthetic lubricant, containing SYNCOLON® (PTFE) particles held in suspension. Super Lube lasts longer and out performs conventional petroleum-based greases and oils. It comes in grease form, an oil with PTFE, and a light-weight oil without PTFE. Packaging includes tubes, grease cartridges, aerosols, bottles, pails, and drums.
  2. How does the chemistry of Super Lube differ from conventional petroleum-based greases and mineral oils? Super Lube Grease and Oils are exceptionally pure lubricants because they are synthetic. This gives Super Lube very stable and predictable chemical properties. Petroleum-based machine and gear oils are made from refined crude oil and contain impurities which cannot be removed. These impurities interfere with film strength and wear protection. They also form deposits at high temperatures and solidify at low temperatures. Petroleum-based greases are formulated by adding lithium, calcium, or sodium thickeners to petroleum-based oil.
  3. What is special about SYNCOLON® (PTFE)? Super Lube Grease and Super Lube Oil with SYNCOLON® (PTFE) contain Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and is the most slippery surface (lowest coefficient of friction) known to man. The SYNCOLON® (PTFE) particles in Super Lube fill surface
    irregularities of mating parts and are compacted like snowflakes in a snowball to form a smooth, lubricated surface. SYNCOLON® (PTFE) provides improved anti-wear properties, is waterproof, not washed away by acids or alkalis, and resists temperatures to 750°F. The SYNCOLON® (PTFE) particles in Super Lube's unique patented formula are held in constant suspension ensuring they will always be evenly applied to the lubricated surface as needed.
  4. What advantages does the Super Lube Lightweight Oil offer compared to lightweight petroleum-based oils? Super Lube Lightweight Oil offers advantages over lightweight petroleum-based oils, such as improved wear resistance and the ability to withstand high temperatures and remains free-flowing in low temperatures. It is an excellent lubricant for dripping and misting applications and as a food-grade chain lubricant.
  5. What are some of the most common uses for Super Lube?
    Household: Door handles, locks and hinges, casters, door tracks, garage door openers, drive chains, gear drives and linkages, nuts and bolts, sewing machines, kitchen cabinets, vacuum cleaners, fans, snowblowers, lawn mowers and garden tools.
    Recreational: Fishing and marine equipment, snowmobiles, sleds, bicycle chains, derailleurs, freewheel clusters, cables, brake handles, calipers, rifles, shotguns, hand guns, ski bindings, zippers, pool gear, beach gear, outboard motors, outriggers, downriggers... winches and pulleys.
    Automotive: Hubs, axles, seat regulators, tracks, pivot points, shackles, wiper motors, antennas, switches, battery terminals...hood and trunk springs, hinges, and window regulators.
    Tools & Machinery: Shackles, winches, motor lifts, spindles, lathes, drill presses, table saws, manual andpower hand tools.

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